Skip to main content

School of Architecture + Planning


Photo: Eleni Bastéa

Eleni Bastéa

  • Director of the International Studies Institute
  • Regents Professor of Architecture

/ 505.277.8513


Education

  • Ph.D. in Architectural History, University of California, Berkeley
  • Master of Architecture, University of California, Berkeley

Research

  • Contemporary Urban and Architectural History
  • Geographies of Loss
  • Modern Greek History and Culture
  • International Histories and Cultures

Eleni Bastéa was born and grew up in Thessaloniki, Greece. The recipient of several grants and awards, she lectures internationally on memory and architecture, cities and literature, Greece & Turkey. She has appeared in the English-language documentaries "Smyrna: The destruction of a cosmopolitan city, 1900-1922" and "From Both Sides of the Aegean, " (both directed by Maria Iliou, Proteus production, 2012). At the University of New Mexico, where she has taught since 2001, she is Regents' Professor of Architecture and Director of the International Studies Institute.

The Power of Place: Globalization and Local Identities (in conjunction with the ISI Lecture Series; Architecture & International Studies)

Peace: From Conflict to Reconciliation (in conjunction with the ISI Lecture Series)

Greece-Turkey, 1922-Present: From Conflict to Rapprochement (History Department)

How Do Societies Remember? (NEH Enduring Questions Grant; Architecture & International Studies)

World Architecture I & II (2 semesters)

Memory and Architecture

Cities and Literature

Cities and Exile

Modern & Contemporary Architecture

European Capitals in the 19th Century

Contemporary Indigenous Architecture (co-taught with Ted Jojola and Lynn Paxson)

Thesis Preparation and Research Methods (Architecture)

International Studies Capstone Seminar


Books, published

Eleni Bastéa, Venice without Gondolas, poetry collection (Georgetown, KY: Finishing Line Press, 2013).

Eleni Bastéa, Aθήνα 1834 – 1896. Νεοκλασική πολεοδομία και ελληνική εθνική συνείδηση [Athens: 1834 – 1896. Neoclassical urban design & Greek national consciousness], translation of The Creation of Modern Athens: Planning the Myth, translated by Eleni Bastéa. (Libro publishers, Athens, 2008).

Eleni Bastéa, ed., Memory and Architecture (Albuquerque: U. of New Mexico Press, 2004).

Eleni Bastéa, The Creation of Modern Athens: Planning the Myth (Cambridge U. Press, 2000). Co-winner of the John D. Criticos Prize and finalist for the Runciman Award.


Book, under contract

Eleni Bastéa, Theodore Jojola, and Lynn Paxson, editors, Contemporary Indigenous Architecture: Local Traditions, Global Winds. Under contract with U. of New Mexico Press.


Chapters in Books, published (Selected, since 2010)

“Beyond the debt to antiquity: Constructing a national architecture for Modern Greece,” in Sofia Voutsaki and Paul Cartledge, editors, Ancient Monuments and Modern Identities: A Critical History of Archaeology in 19th and 20th Century Greece (London and New York: Routledge, 2017); 164—185.

“Jasmine on the balcony: Reflections on Thessaloniki and Beyond,” in Marjorie Agosin, editor, Home: An Imagined Landscape (Kent, UK: Solis Press, 2016): 39—47.

“Athens, 1890–1940: Transitory Modernism and National Realities,” in Races to Modernity. The East European Metropolis 1890-1940, Jan C. Behrends and Martin Kohlrausch, editors (Central European University Press: Budapest and New York, 2014); 127 – 152.

“And perhaps our research leads us back to a world we lost,” in Constructing a Community of Thought: Letters on the Scholarship, Teaching and Mentoring of Vera John-Steiner, Peter Lake and Cathrene Connery, editors (New York: Peter Lang, 2013); 122 – 125.

“Modernization and its discontents in post-1950s Thessaloniki: Urban Change and Urban Narratives,” Eleni Bastéa and Vilma Hastaoglou, in Landscapes of Development: The impact of Modernization Discourses on the Physical Environment of the Eastern Mediterranean, Panayiota Pyla, editor (Cambridge, MA: Harvard U. Graduate School of Design, 2013): 90 – 117.

“Athens” in Capital cities in the Aftermath of the Empires: Planning in Central and Southeastern Europe, Emily Gunzburger Makaš and Tanja Damljanović Conley, editors (Routledge: London & New York, 2010): 29 – 44.

 


Director, International Studies Institute, University of New Mexico (UNM)

Affiliate Professor, Department of Art and Art History, UNM

Member, Global Architectural History Teaching Collaborative, MIT

Affiliate faculty, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, University of Arizona

Member, Editorial Board, Journal of Modern Greek Studies (Johns Hopkins U. Press)

Member, Advisory Board, Journal of Greek Media and Culture, (Intellect) UK

Editorial Board: Hemisphere: Visual Cultures of the Americas, Art & Art History

Board of Academic Advisors, Histories, Spaces and Heritages at the transition from the Ottoman Empire to the Greek state, École Française d’ Athènes


Fellowships, Grants and Awards (Selected; 2010 to the present)

“The Power of Place: Globalization and Local Identities,” Grant from the New Mexico Humanities Council for the Fall 2016 International Studies Institute Lecture Series at UNM, 2016

“How do societies remember?” National Endowment for the Humanities Enduring Questions Grant for new course (with Melissa Bokovoy), 2015-18

“Cities and Literature” and “Memory and Architecture,” Colorado European Union Center of Excellence grants for course development, 2011-15

“Modern Societies in Crisis: Global Challenges and Solutions.” Grants from the New Mexico Humanities Council and the Colorado European Union Center of Excellence for International Studies Institute Lecture Series at UNM, 2014

“Cultures of Exile: Conversations on Language and the Arts.” Grants from the Colorado European Union Center of Excellence and the Modern Greek Studies Association for international conference at UNM, 2013

Regents’ Professor of Architectural History, UNM, 2012

“Contemporary Indigenous Architecture,” grants from UNM for course and book preparation (with Theodore Jojola), 2008-2012

“Greece and Turkey, 1922 – present: From Conflict to Rapprochement,” Colorado European Union Center of Excellence and the Modern Greek Studies Association, 2010