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2015 Souhwest Summer Institute

Southwest Summer Institute

The 2016 Southwest Summer Institute offers stand-alone courses, which can also be taken as part of the UNM School of Architecture & Planning, Graduate Certificate in Historic Preservation and Regionalism. The transcripted six-course Certificate integrates historic preservation with contemporary design, planning and community development grounded in history, culture and place.

Each one week, 3 credit course meets from 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM Monday through Friday at the UNM School of Architecture & Planning, Albuquerque, including field trips. Students complete on-line readings before the "in-class" week, and those who are taking the course for credit also complete a term project after the “in-class” week.

Who Should Take These Courses: Students and professionals in preservation, design, planning, history, sustainability, library science and related fields, as well as the general public, who are welcome to register as non-degree students.

Projected Tuition and Fees: $888 per undergraduate course; $939 per graduate course.

For More Information: Beth Rowe, graduate student advisor, erowe@unm.edu, (505) 277-1303; Monique Rubio, HP+R administrator, mleyba01@unm.edu; and Francisco Uviña-Contreras, HPR Director, fuvina@unm.edu


June 6 – 10
Adobe Historic Buildings Condition Assessment Cours
Arch 462.006, 662.006/CRP470.004, 570.004/LA 512.001

Class: George Pearl Hall at the School of Architecture and Planning, University of New Mexico & one visit in situ to local adobe structure in Albuquerque

This course will give an in depth understanding of how to analyze historic adobe buildings.  Preservation theory will be presented to best inform students on general historic adobe treatments for their conservation.  The course will touch on regional climatic conditions and adobe architectural typologies in order to better understand adobe structures and building systems.  Soil composition and behavior, as well as material types, and compatibilities will be discussed along with pathologies to provide an understanding of how these buildings are constructed and how they deteriorate.  Accepted treatments and professional recommendations will be discussed in order to analyze the best possible solutions for repairs and their preservation, or rehabilitation.  All lessons will be reinforced in the field with one onsite visit to a local adobe building.  Instructors: Francisco Uviña-Contreras, Interim Director, Historic Preservation and Regionalism Graduate Certificate Program at UNM School of Architecture and Planning, preservation and adobe construction specialist; while with Cornerstones Community Partnerships of Santa Fe, he co-authored The Adobe Architecture Conservation Handbook; and Alan “Mac” Watson, Santa Fe native, since 1975 he has worked in architectural conservation as a licensed contractor and  principal of Watson Conserves, LLC.  For many years he has volunteered for Cornerstones Community Partnerships and was on the Cornerstones staff as program manager for northern New Mexico from 1998-2002.  He was appointed by Governor Richardson to the state's Cultural Properties Review Committee and served for two years a Chair of the Committee. In 2011 Dr. Watson was a co-recipient of the John H. Chaffee Trustees Award for Outstanding Achievement in Public Policy, awarded by the Trustees of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.


June 13 – 17
Field School Course
Documentation of endangered historic houses in Chimayo, New Mexico
Arch 462.009, 662.009/CRP 470.009, 570.009/LA 512.002

Class:  George Pearl Hall at the School of Architecture and Planning, University of New Mexico and three days in the field at Plaza del Cerro, Chimayo with two site visits to the Santuario de Chimayo and Cordoba Plaza.

This course will take an important historic site: at Plaza del Cerro at Chimayó, “one of a few surviving fortified defensible plazas located within any of the historic land grant communities in contemporary New Mexico, USA. Established as a Spanish colonial settlement in the early 1740s, the plaza plays an important role in understanding the cultural landscape in the Chimayó Valley through the organization of the built environment.”  Students will document, as well as, develop plans for the restoration of ruined, and deteriorating structures. The course will allow an interdisciplinary group of students to research traditional methods of construction, planning, and architectural typologies.  Depending on number of students and skills, one or two of the abandoned housing units along the plaza will be documented and existing drawings produced.  Students will learn how to produce appropriate documentation plans, and assist the owners, and the community in the rehabilitation of the historic Chimayo Plaza.  On site field measurements will include an understanding of existing pathologies and building typologies.  Students will analyze the existing conditions of the plaza site and begin to formulate recommendations and strategies for the preservation of the historic plaza. Instructors: Francisco Uviña-Contreras, Interim Director, Historic Preservation and Regionalism Graduate Certificate Program at UNM School of Architecture and Planning, preservation and adobe construction specialist; while with Cornerstones Community Partnerships of Santa Fe, he co-authored The Adobe Architecture Conservation Handbook; and Moises Gonzales, Assistant Professor, Community Regional Planning, heads Resource Center for Raza Planning (RCRP). Guest Speaker: Numair Latif, is a graduate of the UNM Historic Preservation and Regionalism Graduate Certificate Program.  He has worked on several HABS/HALS/HAER surveys in Northern New Mexico, including the Chimayo Cultural Landscape Preservation Plan.  Numair Latif is a graduate of the UNM Historic Preservation and Regionalism program, and a recipient of the New Mexico Heritage Scholarship. He has worked on several HABS/HALS/HAER surveys in northern New Mexico, including the Chimayo Cultural Landscape Preservation Plan. He is currently developing projects to preserve historic sites and buildings of the Mughal and British Colonial period in the ancient Indus Valley.
Numair Latif is a graduate of the UNM Historic Preservation and Regionalism program, and a recipient of the New Mexico Heritage Scholarship. He has worked on several HABS/HALS/HAER surveys in northern New Mexico, including the Chimayo Cultural Landscape Preservation Plan. He is currently developing projects to preserve historic sites and buildings of the Mughal and British Colonial period in the ancient Indus Valley.


June 20 – 24
Field School Course 
Documentation and generation of adaptive reuse schematic designs King Stadium, Las Vegas, New Mexico
Arch 462.004, 662.004/CRP 470.003, 570.003/LA 512.003 

Class: George Pearl Hall at the School of Architecture and Planning, University of New Mexico and three days in the field at Las Vegas, NM with a site visit to Historic Las Vegas Downtown.

This course will take historic Kings Stadium in Las Vegas, New Mexico, and document this important Works Progress Administration WPA 1930’s masonry stadium and site.  Students will develop the documentation of the masonry bleachers and record existing conditions.   On site field measurements will include an understanding of masonry pathologies, its repair and options for its rehabilitation.  Research of the site history and community needs will be collected to best propose possible uses for this historic site.  Schematic designs of adaptive reuse of the site will be created through the use of sketches, drawings, and diagrams.  Proposed schematic designs will project all possible uses stimulated by a good understanding of the site context, historical use and community input.  Instructor:  Alfons Poblocki, New Mexico based designer with over 15 years of experience in the preservation and adaptive reuse of historic structures.  He has taught design studio and freehand drawing at UNM and is currently investigating environmentally responsive solutions for his projects in NM.  Guest Speaker:  Shawn Evans, AIA, Director of Preservation and Cultural Projects, Atkin Olshin Schade Architects, and James Marston Fitch Fellow; and Tim B. Castillo, Professor of Architecture and Director of UNM’s digital media Art, Research, Technology and Science Laboratory (ARTS Lab).  Guest speaker (Las Vegas site visit): Elmo Baca, former director of N.M. State Historic Preservation Division and of the N.M. Main Street program, fellow of American Academy in Rome, and author of Rio Grande High Style and Santa Fe Design.

Alfons Poblocki is a NM based designer with over 15 years of experience in the Preservation and Adaptive Reuse of historic structures. He has taught Design Studio and Freehand Drawing at UNM and is currently investigating environmentally responsive solutions for his projects in NMAlfons Poblocki is a NM based designer with over 15 years of experience in the Preservation and Adaptive Reuse of historic structures. He has taught Design Studio and Freehand Drawing at UNM and is currently investigating environmentally responsive solutions for his projects in NM

Past Summer Posters